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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
or at the consulate at benghazi? they're saying some people were from outside the country and some even al qaeda ties. what's the latest information? >> jake, it's important to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun and it will take some time to be completed. that will tell us with certainly what transpired. our current assessment, is that fact what began as was a spontaneous not a premeditated response to what had transpired in cairo, there was a violent protest that was undertaken in reaction to this video that was disseminated. we believe that folks in benghazi, a small number of people came to the consulate to replicate this sort of challenge that was posed in cairo and then as that unfolded, it seems as hijacked, let's us say, by some individual clusters of extremists that came with heavier weapons, weapons as you know, in the wake of the revolution in libya are quite common and accessible. then it evolved from there. we'll get to see exactly what the investigation finally confirms. but that's the best information that we have at present. >> why was there such a security breakdown
the presidential race, the murder of four americans, including the u.s. ambassador in benghazi, libya. the wave of anti-american protests and violence now sweeping the globe. for more on what happened and why, let's bring in the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, dr. susan rice. dr. rice, thank you for joining us. >> first of all, what is the latest on who these attackers were at the embassy or at the consulate in benghazi? we're hearing that the libyans are arresting people. they're saying some people were from outside the country and some even al qaeda ties. what's the latest information? >> jake, first of all, it's important to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun and it will take some time to be completed. that will tell us with certainty what transpired. but our current assessment, is that in fact what began as a spontaneous not a premeditated response to what had transpired in cairo, there was a violent protest that was undertaken in reaction to this video that was disseminated. we believe that folks in benghazi, a small number of people came to the consulate to repli
groups that are operating in the eastern part of the country where the city of benghazi is. we heard yesterday from the country's general national that it's the ruling body here, that they spoke in benghazi and here is what he had to say. >> i wasn't given enough details about this by witnesses, and this makes me 100% sure that it was preplanned. and it was with terrible intention to inflict all this damage, all this. >> and fredricka, this attack did not come out of the blue. this is the latest in a series of attacks we have seen take place in that city of benghazi targeting western interests there. that same u.s. consulate back in june, a bomb exploded outside the consulate gates. there were no casualties in that attack, but it does seem that these extremist groups are operational in the east and are intent on targeting western interests there. >> and the fbi or teams of fbi agents were expected to arrive in libya today. what's the latest on that scheduled trip? >> we're hearing from u.s. officials, fredricka, is that that trip by the fbi team has been delayed. they have postponed
violence and more attacks against u.s. diplomats, alluding to the attacks in benghazi that killed four people. there is higher level of security around the u.s. embassy as local media reported there was credible threat against the embassy. hundred yards to my left is one of roads leading down to the embassy compound. that has 18-foot tall concrete blocks blocking the road so no trucks or cars or for that matter person can get anyway near the embassy. >> gregg: our viewers remember the coverage of the original arab spring. you were right there in the middle of it. now, so many months later, juxtaposed the scenes and explain the change in attitude you have witnessed? >> it has been a change. 18 months, people were chanting freedom. they told you were american and how much they loved the american ideal. now, they are chanting death to america. it's a different crowd and much less educated and much harder line islamic. when incited by this movie a lot of people live on less than $2 a day. these aren't people going on youtube watching a video and coming down to protest. these are people who
consulate in benghazi on the 11th anniversary of the attacks of september 11. these attacks do many things, but they remind us i think first of the bravery and commitment of government officials who serve in countries around the world, supporting the struggles of people in those countries, to live free. and by doing so work to improve our own national security. the attack in libya also reminds us that even though the core of al qaeda has been seriously weakened, we still face threats from an evolving and fractious set of terrorist groups and individuals united by a common ideology which is that of haven't -- violent islamist extremism. ask have some questions to the three of you about the nature of the terrorist threat today and specifically with regard to the reaction to this film whether you think it has raised the threat level against any places or institutions or individuals here in the united states. reporting to us on the terrorist threat to the homeland today, i also hope you'll address other concerns such as the effort to counter homegrown violent islamist groups and the threat to
everything that has transpired since the attacks in benghazi. i think the president, the secretary tried to hit all these points and yet this backdrop of military dignity and precision, an attempt to offer comfort to the families that their loved ones will not be forgotten, this is the kind of honors that the military has rendered so many times over the last 11 years, whether it is the most junior private in the u.s. army that has fallen on the battlefields of afghanistan, a senior diplomat that has revered throughout the muslim world, or a former navy s.e.a.l. who served with honor and distinction and tried to go on and serve again in the diplomatic corps. it is the same honors, the same rendering of respect and dignity that really the military renders to all and has so many times in recent years done. >> absolutely, barbara. it is hard to, as i said to watch this and not be moved. we were fighting back the tears here in the studio. i'm sure people around the world were doing the same. and one can only imagine, only imagine what the family members of these men are dealing with right now
of benghazi and the types of attacks for which those groups have claimed credit in the past, intelligence officials tell the "washington post" the fbi's tentative conclusion, their working hypothesis about what happened in libya is that that assault that killed our ambassador there, quote, was carried out by a group aligned with al qaeda. and that is in contrast to the angry mobs of irate civilians who are menacing u.s. embassies around the world today. they have been riled up by reports of this crude anti-muslim video that turned up on youtube purporting to be a trailer for a longer anti-muslim film. the origins of the film are murky, no one is actually even claiming credit for the film. youtube restricted access to it in countries where anti-muslim speech is restricted and the u.s. continues to try to convince the world just because some wing nut in america made this offensive thing, that does not mean that the u.s. government has anything to do with it. nor does it mean that the government approves of it. nor does it mean that the government should be blamed for its existence. >> we've
the benghazi demonstration into a violent one. intelligence officials are also reviewing telephone records and computer traffic. libyan law enforcement agencies say some arrests have already been made. >>> this morning, we are also getting a look at the ruins of the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, where ambassador chris stevens and the three other americans were killed. coming up at 7:15, how a note found in the debris is shedding light on stevens' mission in libya. >>> in overnight news, san francisco police are investigating a homicide. it happened in the bayview district early this morning. police say they responded to a report of shooting just after 1:30 at osceola lane and lasalle avenue. police haven't released details on the victim or suspects. >>> highway 1 in san mateo county is back open this morning after a fatal crash there shut down part of that roadway for several hours. that crash was reported just before 101:30 last night. so far, no word on the cause. >>> today, parents plan to help clean up the damage left from a fire that gutted a menlo park school. an early morning f
. >> we hear from you fully about your -- benghazi right now and a couple of specifics i want to ask you. was there ever any discussion, after the benghazi attack, of putting marines at the compound in benghazi to help secure it? and what is your assessment and analysis of al qaeda and al qaeda affiliates or inspired organizations there, their ability to assemble and generate an attack capability of this sort very rapidly, and for the united states to openly have no sense that it needed to provide the security to meet that potential threat? what does it say to you about al qaeda related groups in that region? >> okay. first of all with regards to benghazi, what we, what we responded to was a request to provide a f.a.s.t. team that would go into tripoli and try to provide additional security there and we responded to that and did that. at that point, for all intents and purposes, benghazi had been, you know, pretty much unoccupied by any of the diplomatic and, other security personnel that were there. so, the main focus then was on tripoli and the embassy in tripoli and that's what we res
terrorist act against the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> we also need to understand that this is a fairly volatile situation and it is in response, not to the united states policy, not to the administration, not to the american people, it is in response to a video. >> to think that the libyan people are somehow involved in this is just not acrats. it was a terrorist attack. organized and carried out by terrorists. >> the people of egypt, libya, yemen and tunisia did not trade the terny of a dictator for the terny of a mob. >> when it comes to criticism, i would note that many observers, commentators and foreign policy expert, as well as elected officials, democrat and republicans, have pointed out that criticism in particular from governor romny and his team in what seems to be an attempt to score a political point, has been both factually wrong and poorly timed. >> we are told by the media that mitt romney spoke to soon the other day. we are told that mitt romney has no foreign policy experience. yet it was romney who issued the most responsible and presidential statement of anybody. >>
. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birth of a new democracy, as libyans held elections, and built new institutions, and began to move forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens loved his work. he took pride in the country he served, and he saw dignity in the people that he met. and two weeks ago, he traveled to benghazi to review plans to establish a new cultural center and modernize a hospital. that's when america's compound came under attack. along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed in the city that he helped to save. he was 52 years old. i tell you this story because chris stevens embodied the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he built bridges across oceans and cultures, and was deeply invested in the international cooperation that th
.s. consulate in benghazi in june. i want to bring in our cnn national security analyst, peter bergen, who has reported extensively on al qaeda as well as interviewing sbeosama bin la back in '97. i talked to peter earlier and he explained how the u.s. first learned about this al qaeda group in libya. >> reporter: in 2007, the u.s. military recovered a trove of documents in iraq, basically the sort of rosetta stone of al qaeda in iraq. and when they looked at these documents and analyzed them, they found that 40% of the foreign fighters coming into iraq were coming from libya, which was kind of an unexpected thing to find. and so historically, libya has provided quite a lot of suicide attackers to al qaeda and the group that is sort of deemed to be behind this attack is probably one of these sort of splinter groups from al qaeda central. >> how strong is their presence there in libya, and who leads them? do we know? >> reporter: you know, i mean there is sort of umbrella group, according to the former libyan jihadist called ansar al sharia. i think a lot of this is relatively secretive. this i
at the benghazi consulate?" you pick up "the new york times" and you get a blow-by-blow description of what supposedly went o. so it was like pulling teeth to get information yesterday. a lot of senators were frustrated. and you pick up major newspapers in the country and you find details not shared with you. and one of the things i'm worried about is we're trying to find out who committed these terrible acts of terrorism -- and they were acts of terrorism, not a spontaneous riot -- i said, what is the game plan? will they be held as enemy exatents, are they going to be held as common criminals? will they be prosecuted in libya? will they be brought back to the united states? do you have to read them their miranda rights? really absolutely not a whole lot of information. but at the end of the day, it was a lost opportunity i think to inform the congress. can we now move to the rand paul amendment? mr. mccain: mr. president, i'd like to take what remaining time we have in order to discuss the paul amendment. and i'd like to begin by asking insertion in the -- in the "congressional record" a
organizations -- a ship from terrorist organizations towards a mob. we have seen it in bank as a -- benghazi where despite a large security presence, a u.s. ambassador was killed. this suggests we are moving into a world that will be more and more difficult to continue to depend on governments protecting our diplomats because the skit -- the investments required to deal with 400 people, they have huge implications for the number of embassies he can run. >> it will have to remain for the host government. this is an increased threat. that does not reduce the other threats -- the attempt on the life of our ambassador in benghazi. this does that mean other threats are being reduced. there is no way of avoiding the prime responsibility of being host nation. there are many circumstances in which host nations fully lived up to these responsibilities. what we are hearing about your is the exception to that. across the middle east, host nations often do an outstanding job in -- and their police forces often do a great job protecting foreign embassies. where they fall down than to that task, then we h
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)